Over 21 million Americans suffered from a substance use disorder in 2014--a number that is greater than the entire population of New York State. As the United States faces what has been deemed a drug epidemic, with the increased use of heroin and opioids, prevention agencies struggle to find a way to effectively reach the general public, while treatment for those already addicted is scarce.

Addicted: Society’s Stigma Surrounding Addiction

Over 21 million Americans suffered from a substance use disorder in 2014—a number that is greater than the entire population of New York State.  As…

Anxiety and Its Impact on College Campuses

Are you a college student? Do you spend a lot of time on a campus? If so, chances are you’ve seen the stressed visages that are so characteristic of college students. Many college students across the United States have a healthy balance of stress, anxiety, and free time in their lives; however many more suffer from anxiety disorders that have a great impact on their physical and mental health and overall well-being.

Churchill’s Unlikely Source of Success: The Black Dog

Would you believe me if I said World War II may have been won as a result of something as simple as a black dog? No, not the black dog as in the barking canine. The term “black dog” was made infamous by Winston Churchill when he used it to describe his periods of depression. The term is still in use today as synonymous with depression.

“Narrative Enhancement Cognitive Behavioral Therapy”

There is no doubt that a stigma towards depression and mental illness exists in society, but when the stigma that is prevalent is internalized, there can be serious negative outcomes. Internalized stigma can lead to many complications, and can worsen the symptoms of already existing consequences of mental illness. Scientific evidence that shows that in 1 out of every 3 people suffering from mental illness, the rate of internalized stigma is higher, which compromises the outcomes of recovery (Yanos). 

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